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Health Office & Medications

Health Office

Health Office: A Health Technician is present each day.  Therefore, our office staff assumes the responsibilities of caring for ill and injured students.  We are here for emergency care only.  Should a student fall sick during the day, he/she must go home to recuperate, as our facilities are not adequate to provide proper care for long periods at of time.  Any student injured during the school day is brought to our office, evaluated and provided with first aid measures.  If the student is unable to return to school activities, it may be necessary to contact a parent to decide if the child should be seen by the family physician or be taken home to rest. When a student comes to the office, it is the student’s responsibility to inform an adult in the office that he/she is present.

 

Medication: Any student needing to have medication throughout the school day must have a medical release form completed by a doctor and parent or guardian.  Medications are locked up and dispensed according to doctor’s orders.  This includes prescription and over the counter medications.  Students are responsible for coming to the office at the correct time to take their medicine.  If your student has special medical needs, please contact the school to discuss the details of your student’s particular situation.  Students are not permitted to share medication of any kind with other students. Students who give medication to, or receive medication from, another student will be subject to disciplinary action, including possible recommendation for expulsion.  The Health Office does not keep any over-the-counter medication for general student use.  

 

MEDICATION ADMINISTRATION

The California Education Code (Section 49423) allows school staff to assist students who are required to take medication during the school day. When possible, the schedule for giving medication should be planned outside of school hours. Medication, including both prescription and/or non-prescription (over the counter medications* and products) may be administered at school ONLY when the following have been provided:

 

1. Parent/Guardian and Physician

Request for Medication form signed and completed by both the physician and the parent

 

A separate form is required for each medication

 

New forms must be completed each school year and whenever the medication or dosage is changed.

 

2. Medication is supplied in the

If your child has a serious medical condition and your physician feels it is necessary to carry emergency medication with them, please contact your school principal. The medication must be in the original container from the pharmacy labeled with the students name, name of medication, dosage, method administration, and time schedule.

 

Over-the-counter medications include any product or medicine which is purchased without a prescription. This includes: aspirin, aspirin substitutes, all pain relievers, cough medicine, throat lozenges, cold remedies, antihistamines, decongestants, anti-inch lotions and eye drops.

 

 

 

 

 

Good health is an important component for success in school. Please review the following health related information throughout the school year.

ILLNESS

Please have your family health care provider attend to your child’s medical needs as we do not have a school nurse

regularly assigned to your child’s school. Health technicians are available to discuss health concerns, however, they

also are not at school on a daily basis.

When students come to school they should feel well enough to participate in their classroom program. If your child

has any of the following symptoms he/she should not be at school:

 

  •  Fever. (99.6 or higher) Your child must be free of fever for 24 hours before returning to school. (Normal body

discharge is not normal and indicates infection and your child should not be in school). 

  • Nasal congestion or runny nose ( not associated with allergies). Please remember that green or yellow nasal

 

  • Vomiting or diarrhea • Any undiagnosed rashes

 

  • A cold, sore throat or persistent cough • Red or swollen eyes

 

  • Any open sores or open wounds • Earache